Book Review: Sarah Frantz’s O Come All Ye Kinky

Posted January 7, 2013 by Kathy Davie in

I received this book for free from in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

This book may be unsuitable for people under 17 years of age due to its use of sexual content, drug and alcohol use, and/or violence.
Book Review: Sarah Frantz’s O Come All Ye Kinky

O Come All Ye Kinky


Explore it on Goodreads or Amazon.
four-stars

Eight short stories of fairly intense BDSM revolving around a Christmas theme.

Be aware that “twenty-percent of all proceeds from the sale of O Come All Ye Kinky will be donated to the Domestic Violence Project of the National Leather Association-International” intended to provide aid for victims of domestic violence, promote safe sexual practices, and fight bigotry.

My Take

With all the chat there’s been about Fifty Shades and other novels which explore the BDSM scene, I’ve become very aware of how ignorant I am of this attraction. Yes, I’ve been reading a number of them and — keeping in mind that this is my only experience — I think O Come All Ye Kinky‘s selection of short stories is an excellent introduction to what attracts those who need this type of stimulation. The reasons the kink appeals to them.

Each story is different: different settings, different characters, different scenarios. Yet, each is the same. With two characters who care very much for each other. Some are aware of their mutual love. Others walk a long, hard road to find it. The participants in BDSM are just like vanilla people, having the same worries and hopes. The same fears. They simply take a different path to fulfillment.

On the negative side: I’m kinda missing the point of why an eBook has a table of contents if I can’t click to one of its stories? Nor do I understand the point of the graphics. Maybe it’s just the Kindle-effect, but it’s very irritating. Someone should have looked it over before publishing.

The Stories

Jane Davitt‘s “Tree Topper” is a contemporary romance and emphasizes the importance of communication when Martin believes he’s a lousy Dom and Stan won’t talk to him.

This was cute and a good example for anyone in a relationship as to how crucial it is to your and your partner’s happiness to TALK.

Ava March‘s “‘Twas the Night” is an historical romance and very cute. Percival Owens’ relationship with his mother is the same as his sexual and job preference: submissive. It’s Michael Barlow’s forcing him to voice his wants and his shame, Michael’s appreciation for Percy’s strength in giving up control, his assurance that mutual want is all that’s required.

Katie Porter‘s “Fireworks” is a contemporary romance and was very disturbing for its violence. Yeah, I know, BDSM can be violent, but Rachel is just vicious with it even as Emma simply wants more.

Rachel is so incredibly insecure while Emma is so in want and neither is able to communicate this to the other. A transfer to Tokyo is about to separate the two and Rachel daren’t ask for more.

L.A. Witt‘s “Candy Caning” was too sweet and funny! This is a contemporary relationship in which each knows the other loves him, and the story dives into the dismal abyss of the family Christmas dinner. Nate’s mother is a bitch-and-a-half, and Christmas dinner has been a nightmare ever since Nate began bringing Stephen.

Stephen may be the Dominant partner, but not when it comes to Christmas shopping, LOL. And he loves Nate enough to come along. Very handy when Stephen finds the perfect cane for his boy!

This was one of my favorites.

Joey W. Hill‘s “Submissive Angel” is another lovely, contemporary story. This tale is about Robert and his vintage toy shop and the young man he rescues from a horrible beating.

In some ways, each is rescuing the other. The balletic Ange with his appreciation for life, Christmas, and Robert, who needs someone real in his life.

Another favorite, I definitely want to read more Joey Hill!

Elyan Smith‘s “Open Return” is a rather sad, terrifying, and hopeful contemporary romance all at once. Zach was once Hannah and he escaped his hometown to find himself only to return one Christmas Eve. For all the wandering and exploration, he’s never found what he had in Scott and Laura.

This was confusing. Smith did well in teasing me in, making me wonder who or what Zach had been before, however, the revelation towards the end was unsatisfying. I had too many questions still revolving in my head. Nor was I happy that Smith hadn’t explained Michael and Elaine. Just a few brief mentions of two people who took him in and cared for him. Provided him with a refuge for so many years. And now he’s back, using them again.

Alexa Snow‘s “Ring Out the Old and In the New“, a contemporary romance, is just heartbreaking. Evan was attacked and cut in the Tube one night, and, two months later, he’s still terrified to leave their apartment. They haven’t had sex since that night, and Russell is worried at how isolated Evan is.

It takes some force and a lot of love to convince Evan he’s as beautiful as ever.

Kim Dare‘s “Very Last Chance” is a bit cold with a nervous Dom and a nervous sub. Each has fallen in love with the other and neither believes the other returns that love.

It’s an interesting conflict with a Dominant who is trying to show his skeptical sub that he loves him without losing his authority while the sub is terrified that his unromantical Master is about to cut him loose. It’s the candle wax scene which brings Drew to the realization that he loves Kingsley. And to the despair that his love is hopeless.

In some respects, it’s almost funny how scared Kingsley is. He is such an intimidating man, and this contrast with his fear that he’ll lose Drew, that he won’t be able to declare his love without losing Drew’s respect is both sad and embarrassing. Embarrassing because I think it’s the fear anyone has in laying oneself open to rejection.

The Cover and Title

The cover is vividly intense with its reds and oranges. I liked the holiday touches with the holly in the corners and Santa’s two “elves” going at it in the background. Then there’s the red ribbon wrapping the foremost character’s arms. It is living up to its theme!

The title just cracks me up. It appeals to the sexual side of the stories as well as carrying on the theme of Christmas with its Come All Ye Kinky.

four-stars

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