Book Review: Laura Griffin’s Thread of Fear

Posted March 4, 2016 by Kathy Davie in Book Reviews

This book came from the library, and I will never give you less than an honest review, no matter its source. I do provide informational and purchase links to make it more convenient for you to access the book. I also receive a percentage of the sale if you use one of my links to buy it. And that's not enough money to be less than truthful *grin*.

Book Review: Laura Griffin’s Thread of Fear

Thread of Fear

by Laura Griffin

five-stars

Series: The Glass Sisters #1

Other books by this author that I've reviewed include Deadly Promises, Untraceable, Unspeakable, Unforgivable, Snapped, Twisted, Scorched, Exposed.

Genres: Romantic Suspense

This Paperback has 371 pages and was published by Pocket Star on September 30, 2008. Discover more about it at Goodreads. You can also buy it at Amazon

First in The Glass Sisters romantic suspense series, a prequel to Griffin’s Tracers, and revolving around a pair of sisters in Texas. The couple focus is on Fiona Glass and Chief Jack Bowman.

Yep, it’s that Ray Santos with the FBI who made me think I was reading a Tracers story, so it does make sense that this is a prequel.

My Take

I can certainly understand why Fiona would want to stop doing the forensic art. I’d have been emotionally exhausted a long time ago.

What is with people who think it’s okay for women to be raped? Would they feel the same way about a guy? Heck, they’d probably figure he was lucky. Almost worse is the lack of investigation put into this crime. Even a half-assed detective should have done better than this! It’s a real shame that it takes the abduction of an “important” person to kick the county sheriff into doing something. Really, it will boggle your mind how incompetent the sheriff’s department is. I hate cops who aren’t on the job to do the right thing. Although, I did enjoy Jack’s diatribes against Spivey and Rudd, *grin*.

I’m sorry, but Grainger County deserves what it gets if it can’t figure out a way to get rid of Spivey and Rudd. As for Jack, what is it with all the lying? Is it a side effect of the job?

Of course, I’m not too excited about the stupid woman-who-insists-on-running-into-danger trope. And what is Fiona thinking, not getting her locks changed?? Jack, on the other hand, is suffering the pangs of living in a small town. His old hometown. With all the townsfolk (and his mom and sisters) gossiping about his sex life.

What’s with that loose thread about a misunderstanding in Houston?

I did enjoy Jack’s chasing Fiona. And I definitely understood her decision to avoid getting involved with a man who lies. Although, I understood why he deceived her. I do like a man with a strong sense of right and wrong. He’s also quite compassionate and thoughtful, as proven by his observation about Fiona’s art and his unconscious actions that morning at breakfast.

Griffin really thought this through in her characterization of Fiona. I love how Fiona empathizes with the kids, how she draws them out. For all that Fiona is an artist, I do wish we’d gotten more of a peek at the artistic side of her life than just the last painting she’s doing. It does sound luscious!

Interesting tip about the toothpaste and toothbrush for shiners.

Yep, there is a lot of good in this. It’s the bad that will have you roaring in frustration and wondering how Jack will figure out who the murderer is.

The Story

Forensic artist Fiona Glass is the best in the business — which is precisely why she’s quitting. Her skill at mining victims’ memories to re-create the faces of sadistic criminals has left her haunted and wary, and only Jack Bowman’s dogged persistence convinces her to help him.

The rugged police chief is hunting a serial killer who’s targeting teenage girls. But what seems like a simple assignment is fraught with complications, including a searing attraction to Jack that’s tempting Fiona to let her guard down in potentially dangerous ways.

Jack never intended for Fiona to become so deeply involved in the case — or in his life. But every instinct tells him she’s his best hope for finding a psychopath who’s lurking in plain sight, growing more ruthless with each passing day. And now that Fiona is right in the killer’s crosshairs, the only way to keep her safe is to unravel a small town’s darkest secrets, one terrifying thread at a time…

The Characters

The very responsible Fiona Glass is an artist teaching a class on Survey of Western Art. Her Type-A grandfather had been a structural engineer. Aaron Rhodes is a musician and her ex-boyfriend. Courtney is her very selfish ne’er-do-well sister who works all over the beauty industry. David is her current boyfriend, an attorney from Dallas. Lucky for Courtney that her sister is friends with Nathan. Their dad was with the San Antonio PD.

Graingerville, Texas
Jack “J.B.” Bowman is the town police chief; he used to work homicide in Houston until his dad got sick. Carlos and Lowell are a couple of his deputies. Sharon is a new deputy who missed the class on “Gatekeeping”. Dr. Russell Jamison is the Grainger County medical examiner.

Maria “Lucy” Luz Arrellando was abducted and raped. Eleven years ago. Now she creates gorgeous quinceañera dresses. Dolores is Lucy’s sister; Sebastian and Vanessa are Dolores’ kids. Nola Fuentes is Natalie‘s mother. The young and artistic Brady Cox is a student who saw bad things. Marissa Pico is Senator Ben Pico’s youngest daughter. Father Alvaro is with Blessed Sacrament Church in Hamlin. Veronica Morales is a seventeen-year-old whose disappearance the sheriff’s department refused to investigate. Her family does a much better job of investigating than the sheriff.

Lorraine Snelly runs the lunch counter in town. The uncooperative Norma and racist Melvin Schenck work over at Texas Parks and Wildlife. I think Scott Schenck is his son; Gabriela Vega had been a girlfriend of Scott’s. Max is Scott’s Rottweiler. Becker’s is a bar, pool hall, and restaurant with great food. Ginny Kuzak is the cook and best friends with Jack’s mom. Allyson is a sympathetic waitress. The Dough Boys are a bunch of hoodlums wreaking havoc. Edna Golby wants to press charges against her neighbor. Mary Ellen is the principal at the elementary school. Hoyt Dixon is a drunken jerk.

Grainger County Sheriff’s Department is…
…run by Bob Spivey, Randy’s father-in-law, and the mayor. Media hog Randy Rudd is the incompetent county sheriff who is threatened by Jack. Myrna is a deputy who guards Randy’s door.

Texas Ink does tattoos. Viper is one of their tattoo artists.

Austin PD
Detective Nathan Devereaux has worked frequently with the very intuitive Fiona.

John D. Alvin is a married attorney in Austin.

FBI
Special Agent Garrett Sullivan is with the FBI’s Child Abduction Rapid Deployment team. Special Agent Ray Santos requests Fiona’s help on another case.

Shelby Sherwood is ten years old. We’re hoping she makes it to eleven. Colter is her six-year-old brother. Annie Sherwood is their mother.

Keith Janovic, a.k.a., Ron Jones, collects child pornography and works at the Second Go Round. George Green. The case of Polly Klaas has law enforcement on its toes.

The Cover and Title

The cover is green with its night scene of an abandoned farm building in a field, separated from us by wooden rails.

The title is a misnomer, as each victim has known much more than a Thread of Fear.


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